The YearBook part 2

The yearbook, part 2

In part 1 of the Yearbook we left of actually discovering Construct 2 and creating my first demos with it. So we will continue from that.

Spring and summer of 2013 (becoming a published game developer)

I was hooked to 2d game development. I did several demos and projects, most of them using premade graphics from public domain sites etc. 1st game I finished was a kind of Boulder Dash meets Pacman meets Lost Vikings type of game. Also I started working on this couple of months after The Unexpected Journey game out, so of course it had a dwarf theme. This game was never published but I did create a web version of it and but it on my google.sites site. So that was my first experience about compiling a game and putting it out there.

My first somewhat complete game: Feral Dwarfs

My first somewhat complete game: Feral Dwarfs

 

At summer I decided that it was time to create my first complete game that I would actually publish. At this point I had an understanding of how to create different game mechanics and elements but had no clue what kind of work it would take to actually finish and polish the project. SO this was a time when Angry Birds was topping charts and I do admit that my game although very different was heavily inspired by Angry birds. So my first game: “Seagull happens” was first published at September of 2013. At the time I was pretty naive, as I think most aspiring developers are and I remember having this big expectations for my game. So needless to say, I was disappointed.

My first published game Seagull Happens

My first published game Seagull Happens

I published the game in Kongregate and through Clay.io. I think to this day I have made around 3$ from it. But on the bright side, game served its purpose and I actually learned how to handle the whole process from drawing boards to actual launch of the game. At this time my life outside of game development changed up pretty drastically and for the next year or so I could not do game development pretty much at all. I spent that year in abroad in a place where I had no way to use computers or internet.

From fall of 2014 to spring 2015 (developing style)

After I came back home at fall of 2014 I proceeded where I left of in a year before. I did couple of small projects and was focusing more than before to actually learning to do my own graphics. I developed a “style” of my own. It`s not actually my own, since a lots of people use similar style but rather a style that would suit my needs and skill level. My style in a nutshell is to have black outlining, base color, 1 bright highlight color and 1 darker shading tone for each actual color or object. I walk you through on how to actually draw like this in another blog post.

Couple of character created using "my" method.

Couple of character created using “my” method.

Practice work featuring Predator, because lets face it Predator is awesome

Practice work featuring Predator, because lets face it Predator is awesome

In early 2015 I wanted to create my next complete game. I ended up creating a game called “Croak for it.” Game is an endless jumper for mobile. If the point of Seagull happens was to learn the whole process of creating a game and publishing it, Croak for it was the same for mobile. I aimed this game for Android since the beginning. Another goal for me was to learn how to implement ads for the game. At this point I was just learning how to do it technically and had no idea of the actual monetization strategy or anything like that. When I learned how to compile games for Android I also created a mobile version of Seagull Happens as well. You can download both of this from google play if you want to.Here are the links: Seagull Happens & Croak for it.

Croak for it

Croak for it

One thing I learned from mobile publishing was that new developers can`t get any downloads from google play. If you get 10 downloads that are not from your friends or relatives you are doing awesome. And this is for free games. If your game costs something you will get 0 downloads. I am not exaggerating this is the actual reality. Main reason for this is that Google play does not have “new games” category that would at least give you a chance of getting some downloads early on. There are other places to publish your Android games though. GetJar being one of them, from GetJar I actually got couple of thousand downloads so there is potential there. If you have a solid game, you can actually get some visibility there. I ended up generating around 35$ from my mobile experiment. This is what I achieved without any strategy on ad placement or any ad optimization or without doing any marketing or promotion at all.

This concludes part 2 of this series, I will come back with more Indie experiment in part 3 of the series. Stay tuned.

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